History of the Eighteenth Century and of the Nineteenth Till the Overthrow of the French Empire; With Particular Reference to Mental Cultivation and Progress

History of the Eighteenth Century and of the Nineteenth Till the Overthrow of the French Empire; With Particular Reference to Mental Cultivation and Progress

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ...in the hands of the whole people; the poorer class, who were merely armed with pikes, by the reception of the citizens into the national guard, were converted into a kind of ochlocratic army. By the union of the jacobin clubs in every city, town and village with the parent club in Paris, the last was raised to a dreadful central authority of the ochlocracy, and even a species of tumultuary justice and police was exercised by the presidents of the clubs, sections and communes. Although the course of demagogy in Paris and the relation of the different democratical parties has been already explained in the first division of this volume ( I.) till the month of March 1792, we must however return to the subject, in order to place in a just light the connexion of the new ministry forced upon the king by the European monarchs. As early as September 1791, Prussia and Austria were ready to repudiate all that they were said to have resolved upon and threatened at Pilnitz, and the emperor even went so far as to cause a new circular to be issued, in which he in some measure recalled everything which he had previously declared, because the king of France at that time had formally and solemnly recognized the new constitution. The emperor declares: "His majesty desires to inform all the courts to whom his first circular from Padua of the 6th of July was sent, and together with them Sweden, Denmark, Holland and Portugal, that the relations of the king of France which gave rise to that circular are now changed, and he therefore feels himself compelled to communicate his views to the above-mentioned powers. His majesty believes it may now be properly assumed, that the king of France is free, and that consequently his acceptance of the new constitution...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 270 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 485g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236637380
  • 9781236637383