The History of the Early Postmarks of the British Isles; From Their Introduction Down to 1840. with Special Remarks on and Reference to the Sections O

The History of the Early Postmarks of the British Isles; From Their Introduction Down to 1840. with Special Remarks on and Reference to the Sections O

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ... was not three miles from the districts included. The following year (1832) Fig. 181. saw the limits of the Three penny Post extended to a circle of twelve miles from the General Post Office, which brought such towns as Kingston, Hounslow, Southall, Edgware, Stanmore, Barnet, Waltham Cross, Eomford, and Foots Cray within its delivery. In 1834 the Gerrard Street Office was abolished, the sole Chief Office being then located in the General Post Office. In the Twopenny Post an entirely different arrangement from that existing in the Inland Office prevailed in respect to the paid and unpaid marks, both being printed in red ink. The distinction was that the unpaid stamps bore a single rim (Figs. 182 and 183) and the paid stamps a double rim (Figs. 184 and 185). In 1831, the consolidation of the Twopenny and General Post receiving houses was suggested. At this period there were 64 General and 169 Twopenny Post receiving houses within the London District. For instance, in Holborn there were no less than seven, four for the Twopenny, and three for the General Post. In the Strand there were five, two for the General, and three for the Twopenny Post. In Tottenham Court Eoad there were four, three for the Twopenpy, and one for the General Post; and so throughout London. Where there were several receiving houses in one thoroughfare or district, they were distinguished by initials, such as "W.O," "S.O," "CO," "E.O," &c. (Figs. 186 to 189). These initials mean Western Office, Southern Office, Central Office, Eastern Office, &c. The General Post receivers' marks were identified by the absence of "T.P"(Figs. 190 and 191). There was considerable difference between the two classes of receivers. For...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 188.98 x 246.13 x 1.27mm | 68.04g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236634519
  • 9781236634511