History of the Early Kings of Persia, from Kaiomars, the First of the Peshdadian Dynasty to the Conquest of Iran by Alexander the Great

History of the Early Kings of Persia, from Kaiomars, the First of the Peshdadian Dynasty to the Conquest of Iran by Alexander the Great

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1832 edition. Excerpt: ...in the pages of Time, that they cannot be effaced by the ravaging hand of ages, or the penetrating influence of the stars: the robes of his splendor and freshness are never worn out nor antiquated. It is related, that when the people of Mazenderan, withdrawing their heads from the collar of obedience and submission to Kaikobad, had opened the door to every kind of excess and rebellion, the governor appointed to that district transmitted a concise account of what had taken place, and requested to be informed by the profound sagacity of his sovereign. On this, the lord of the world ordered a royal mandate to be sent to the revolters, containing threats and promises, and comprehending in it the following words: --" My people should not be less "sensible of the need there is for a ruler, chief "and supreme governor, than the honey-bees and "storks; for these creatures appoint from among "themselves a leader, to whom they pay implicit "obedience. My people should also take example "from the ants, and not be slothful in preparing "the necessary stores at the proper season; that is, "the due arrangement of human concerns, and the "security of the necessaries of life, are centred in "and cemented solely by the strict justice of the "monarch, the vigilance of governors, and the "policy of rulers. The people in some measure "resemble sheep and oxen; as their energies are "confined to the obtaining of food and laying up "things of indispensable necessity, and their am"bition settled on acquiring profit or pleasure. "Some of the sons of Adam are like flies, which "subsist on human food: this description of men is "the most worthless in society, and the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236787161
  • 9781236787163