The History of Detroit and Michigan; Or, the Metropolis Illustrated; A Full Record of Territorial Days in Michigan, and the Annals of Wayne County Volume 1

The History of Detroit and Michigan; Or, the Metropolis Illustrated; A Full Record of Territorial Days in Michigan, and the Annals of Wayne County Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...was much discomfort, the mild weather made it endurable for a time. The country people soon poured in, with materials to be paid for when the citizens were able, and also offered their assistance to raise new buildings. Timber, plank, stone, lime, brick, and other materials necessary for building were of course in great demand, --a state of affairs which appears to have been peculiarly satisfactory to the lumbermen, and in a letter to James Madison, written August 3, 1805, and on file at Washington, Governor Hull makes known the horrible suspicion of the people. He says, "It has not been ascertained how the fire took place, but it is generally believed it was by design, and by persons interested in the lumber trade. Contracts had been previously made for all the lumber at the mills, and which could be sawed this season, which was a novel arrangement in this country." Was it in deference to this belief that Governor Hull issued a proclamation on September 4, 1805, forbidding all persons, on pain of fine and imprisonment, to cut any timber in the St. Clair pinery? or was it because he purposed to prevent, as he did prevent, the people from building on their old lots, in order to secure the adoption of a new and really better plan? Such, at least, was the result of his efforts, for no houses were built during all that year, In connection with plans for the relief of the people, some curious statements are made by Mr. Gentle. He says: Two or three days after the fire, the sufferers met in McComb's orchard and appointed a committee to forward petitions to different parts, and to receive contributions for the relief of the sufferers. Through neglect the petitions were not forwarded until about six weeks afterwards. By that time the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 684 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 35mm | 1,202g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236951352
  • 9781236951359