History of Delaware County; And Border Wars of New York, Containing a Sketch of the Late Anti-Rent Difficulties in Delaware with Other Historical and Miscellaneous Matter Never Before Published

History of Delaware County; And Border Wars of New York, Containing a Sketch of the Late Anti-Rent Difficulties in Delaware with Other Historical and Miscellaneous Matter Never Before Published

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ...bordering on the river below the Middletown line, was owned by James Phenix, who was among the first that emigrated after the Revolution. He had occupied the place before the war, but had retired for safety during that period. A man by the name of Olmstead, who came in about the same time, possessed the second farm. The third farm had been originally taken up by a man named Burgher, whose unfortunate end we have related _in a previous chapter. The next farm was occupied by Joseph Erksine, an English soldier, who was taken prisoner and afterwards enlisted in the American service. The next in course, following down the river, were Silas Parish, from Dutchess County, who had emigrated at an early day, E. Washburn, from the same place, and a few years later, Eli Sears, father of T. B. Sears, of Tompkins County, delegate to the state convention in 1846. At Shavertown, were several families, among whom were Jacob Shaver, Adam Shaver and John Shaver, from Dutchess County, and Philip Barnhart from Schoharie County, all of whom had located there about the same time. Mrs. Barnhart, was a sister of the father of Ex-Governor Bouck, and quite a number of her descendants remain in that neighbourhood yet. The first settler back from the river was Robert Nicholson, who located about three miles up the Tremperskill, which empties into the Delaware river at Shavertown. He moved with his family, in 1793. Philip Shaver, located himself on the same stream the following spring, and Thomas More, about a mile above, sometime during the same season. In the spring of 1797, Mark Summers settled about half a mile still farther up, and Jonathan Earl, shortly after, one and a half miles above Summers, and within half a mile of what is now Andes village. About the same...
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Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 249g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236963598
  • 9781236963598