The History and Debates of the Convention of the People of Alabama; Begun and Held in the City of Montgomery, on the Seventh Day of January, 1861; In Which Is Preserved the Speeches of the Secret Sessions and Many Valuable State Papers

The History and Debates of the Convention of the People of Alabama; Begun and Held in the City of Montgomery, on the Seventh Day of January, 1861; In Which Is Preserved the Speeches of the Secret Sessions and Many Valuable State Papers

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1861 edition. Excerpt: ...The Government was then in its infancy; cotton had not been cultivated, and the great value of slave labor not tested; perhaps, too, the influences which a more refined civilization, combined with the great powers of religion, had not shed their holy influences upon, and ameloriated the condition of the Slaves themselves. But now the argument is not that slavery is an evil. nor that slavery is not profitable, but the fears that fanaticism will be enraged; that slavery may become a burden; that we may have too many; and with some who have as many negroes as they want and are rich by the high priceof their property, it is urged that more and cheaper negroes, and a new market might lessen their estates in value, by bringing down the prices of negroes, and making productions too abundant. It is thought that the increase from natural causes will be suflicient for all practical purposes; to that class of owners who are governed by mere dollars and cents, this argument must be plausible. By far the larger proportionof our people who aid in bearing the burdens, both in war and peace, may take difiererut views. They are as loyal to' the Government, and to the institution of slavery as are the largest slave-holders in the Confederate States.' They are not as able to purchase--many, not able to purchase at all on account of the prices being too high; they may think that they have at least equal rights to a voice in this matter 3 and if they do not desire that other cheap slave markets may be opened at this time, yet they would doubtless prefer that the privilege to /save them opened hereafter would be secured to them. We have vast amounts of wild lands, which were unavailable, while prices were high, for the poor could not purchase. But...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 148 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 277g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236761693
  • 9781236761699