History of Cumberland and Adams Counties, Pennsylvania; Containing History of the Counties, Their Townships, Towns, Villages, Schools, Churches, Industries, Etc.; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; Biographies; Volume 1

History of Cumberland and Adams Counties, Pennsylvania; Containing History of the Counties, Their Townships, Towns, Villages, Schools, Churches, Industries, Etc.; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; Biographies; Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ...you, O men, I call; and my voice is to the sons of man." He also baptized Joseph Glendenning, John M'Clelland and Jane Swansie, infant children of residents of that neighborhood. August '23, 1752, Mr. Cuthbertson held his first communion in America. It was at Stony Ridge, or the Walter Buchanan or J unkin " tent," in Cumberland County. The communicants came to the table singing the Twenty-fourth Psalm. About 250 persons communed, and this comprised very nearly all the Covenanters in this county, for the place was central, the season pleasant, and they gathered in from their different settlements, the Covenanters also of adjoining counties. This was the first time that the followers of Cameron and Cargill ever gathered at the communion table in the new world or outside the British isles. Their next pastor was Rev. Matthew Lind, of the Covenanter congregation at Aghadoe, near Coleraine. He came in December, 1773; locating at Paxtang. and assumed the pastorate of that church and of the Stony Ridge. Walter Buchanan was the only elder in Stony Ridge when Mr. Lind was installed. About that time Joseph J unkin was ordained. He lived upon the present Kanaga farm: built his present stone house, and had the "tent" upon it during his life time. Still later it was known as "Widow Junkin's tent." This little church was always a colony, surrounded by a population which had no sympathy with them. Later, when the Germans came in, they literally crowded out the Irish, and in a few years both congregations were completely exterminated--so completely that there is scarcely a tradition of their existence left among the present inhabitants. The Bells, and the Swansies, and the J unkins attached themselves to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 522 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 27mm | 921g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236792831
  • 9781236792839