History of Congress; Biographical and Political Comprising Memoirs of Members of the Congress of the United States, Drawn from Authentic Sources Embracing the Prominent Events of Their Lives, and Their Connection with the Volume 1

History of Congress; Biographical and Political Comprising Memoirs of Members of the Congress of the United States, Drawn from Authentic Sources Embracing the Prominent Events of Their Lives, and Their Connection with the Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1848 edition. Excerpt: ... the removal, subsistence, and benefit of such Seminole Indians as should surrender for emigration. The construction put upon that act, in March, 1841, under the administration of Gen. Harrison, admitted a very broad discretion in regard to it. Mr. Bell, Secretary of War, a few days after, issued instructions to Col. Worth, commanding officer in Florida, in regard to these negroes, who had run away from their masters in Florida, that they might pay their owners for them. There were a number of these slaves (say about nine) that had ran away from their masters, and went to the Seminoles. They, the Seminoles, refused to come in, and enter into the treaty, unless a stipulation was entered into by General Worth that these slaves should accompany them when they were removed. "Mr. Giddings said he was satisfied with the gentleman's explanation. In the ordinary discharge of his duties as a representative on that floor, he assured the committee that while he did not claim to be above any member there, he did not admit himself to be inferior to any one. His people were an independent people, and their representative was as much entitled to respect as any other member on this floor. "So far as regarded character and standing, he would say that it was for his constituents to judge if he was worthy to represent them. If they should thrust him aside as unworthy to represent them, he would have nothing more to say. If his course on that floor had been such as to meet the condemnation of his constituents, and to cause them to thrust him aside, he should hide his head with shame. The gentleman from Georgia would make his own application of this remark. Coming here, condemned as he was by the people he represented, saying that he was unworthy to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 218 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 399g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236628594
  • 9781236628596