A History of the Colony of Victoria: Volume 1, A.D. 1797-1854

A History of the Colony of Victoria: Volume 1, A.D. 1797-1854 : From its Discovery to its Absorption into the Commonwealth of Australia

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Description

The first attempt by Europeans to settle in the area that eventually became the state of Victoria, Australia, was led by Colonel David Collins in 1803. Melbourne was founded in 1835, and after the discovery of gold in 1851 became the financial centre of Australia. This authoritative two-volume history of the state's first century, published in 1904 by the banker Henry Gyles Turner (1831-1920), is based on parliamentary records and information from leading political figures with whom the author was personally acquainted. Volume 1 traces Victoria's development from its early settlement to its establishment as an independent colony and the discovery of gold. It explores the region's progress and the challenges it faced as the gold rush led to overpopulation, high living costs, and mining disputes. The book gives first-hand insights into a time of rapid political, social and economic change.show more

Product details

  • Electronic book text
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Cambridge University Press (Virtual Publishing)
  • Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 2 maps
  • 1139109030
  • 9781139109031

Table of contents

Preface; 1. Introductory; 2. The abortive settlement of 1803; 3. Intermediary exploration; 4. Captain Sturt: The Hentys: Major Mitchell; 5. The founding of Melbourne; 6. The first year of the settlement; 7. The first attempt at government; 8. The Port Phillip Association; 9. The land question; 10. The Aborigines and their treatment; 11. Mr. Latrobe's early administration; 12. The constitution of 1842; 13. The new colony: its progress and limitations; 14. The first Legislative Council: the men and their measures; 15. The social, commercial and financial confusion of 1852, 1853 and 1854; Appendix.show more