The History, Civil, Political and Military, of the Southern Rebellion; From Its Incipient Stages to Its Close. Comprehending, Also, All Important State Papers, Ordinances of Secession, Proclamations, Proceedings of Congress, Volume 3

The History, Civil, Political and Military, of the Southern Rebellion; From Its Incipient Stages to Its Close. Comprehending, Also, All Important State Papers, Ordinances of Secession, Proclamations, Proceedings of Congress, Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1861 edition. Excerpt: ...him to carry his heavy vessels np a river whose waters never before had floated such craft. It was an unwise attempt, as the result proved; but, having reduced and passed the rebel forts and batteries above and below, it was considered but a few weeks' work, at most, to reduce Vicksburg--hence the assault which followed the refusal o/Coroniander Lee's first demand (see page 125) of surrender. 29th, to tho Commanding General, shows how the order was enforced: "Okxirjil: Tho man who guided the rebels to the bridft that was burned was hung to-day. He bod token the oath Tho houses of four others who aided have been burned to tho ground." Several of Farragut's """tuck e lighter vessels moved up the river during the latter part of May. On the 23d Grand Oulf, just below Vicksburg, was shelled, in their passage up, by the Hartford and Richmond--a masked battery having been developed on the bank. The Kennebec moved up to within two miles of the main fortifications, on the 25th, when she was opened upon by one of the lower batteries and struck by one shot. No immediate operations followed, it having been pronounced necessary to await the arrival of the co-operating force. A portion of General 'Williams' command, from Baton Rouge, nrrived on May 30th, convoyed by the Kennebec, but it was not until June 25th that a brigade of four regiments reached the point of operations. Ere that date Corinth had fallen, Memphis had been occupied and Beauregard's army scattered. General Earl Van Dorn having been assigned to the "Department of Louisiana," on the 24th June issued an order, recommending " that all persons living within eight miles of the Mississippi river remove their families and servants to the interior, as it was the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 414 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 22mm | 735g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236522826
  • 9781236522825