A History of the Campains of the British Forces in Spain and Portugal, 1

A History of the Campains of the British Forces in Spain and Portugal, 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1812 edition. Excerpt: ... agree, able and healthy, is sufficiently elevated to command a view of the sea and a part of the adjacent country; the environs are rural and watered by a little river. A mountain, by which it is commanded, and, if I may so speak, surrounded, shelters it from the south and west winds; in a word, the situation is soch as Vitruvius particularly recommends as the most healthy; the theatre is also constructed in such a manner as to render it very sonorous; a man, placed in the concavity of the mountain, easily ijiakes himself heard by persons at the opposite extremity, ' and the sound instead of diminishing seems to increase. I made thk Parts of that singular military antiquity, a battering ram, are preserved at Morviedro. vienc. experiment: one of my friends, standing upon the place where the stage formerly was, recited a few verses from the Amphytrion of Plautus: 1 was in the most elevated part of the theatre and heard him very distinctly. These rocks may be said to have a voice, and one five times stronger than that of a man; so: much energy does it receive from the cavities made by art in the mountain. The semicircle, which the people called the perimetre, is about four hundred and twenty-five feet in circumference; its height from the orchestra to the most elevated seats is a hundred' feet, and to the end of the wall behind them a. hundred and ten; the diameter of the orchestra, from the centre of which' every admeasurement should be taken, is seventy-two foet. The word orchestra signified, with the Greeks, a place for the performance of dances and pantomimes; among the Romans it had a different use and meaning, at least after Attilius Seranus and L. Scribonius Libo were aediles curules; they followed the advice of Scipio...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 102 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236930266
  • 9781236930262