A History of the Book of Common Prayer and Other Books of Authority, with an Attempt to Ascertain How the Rubrics and Canons Have Been Understood and Observed from the Reformation to the Accession of George III; Also a Account of the

A History of the Book of Common Prayer and Other Books of Authority, with an Attempt to Ascertain How the Rubrics and Canons Have Been Understood and Observed from the Reformation to the Accession of George III; Also a Account of the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1859 edition. Excerpt: ...since the accession of James I.' Of the same character were most of the charges against Laud, but they were readily received by his enemies. It is, therefore, strange that modern writers should repeat charges which admit of so easy a refutation. After the removal of the Book of Common Prayer and the imposition of the Covenant, the Presbyterians contemplated the erection of their Discipline. But before the object could be attained, the Independents acquired sufficient power to supplant the Presbyterians, and therefore the Scottish system was never imposed. Ministers were at liberty to practise the discipline, provided the people were willing to submit, but they could not impose it upon their congregations. Thus it was never more than tolerated in England. " There was another generation of men which, like the frozen snake that lay in their bosoms, seemed but to desire the same things with them; but they had further designs, to de stroy and cut off not a few, alter the Church government, have no order in the Church. This was the venom they harboured, which at first they were not warm enough to put forth."" Still we find many eulogiums of the Covenant, and numerous denunciations against Covenant breakers, in the sermons preached before the Parliament. The members could listen to the preachers, though they did not mean to follow their advice. " In the place of a long Liturgie, wee are in hope of a pithy Directorie: where Popish altars and crucifixes did abound we begin to see more of Christ crucified. Instead of the prelate's oath we have a solemn Covenant, engaging us to endeavour reformation, yea, and the extirpation of popery and prelacy itself1." The toleration required by the Independents was attacked from the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 192 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 354g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236932498
  • 9781236932495