History of the Army of the Cumberland; Its Organization, Campaigns and Battles, Written at the Request of Major-General George H. Thomas Chiefly from His Private Military Journal and Official and Other Documents Furnished by Him Volume 1

History of the Army of the Cumberland; Its Organization, Campaigns and Battles, Written at the Request of Major-General George H. Thomas Chiefly from His Private Military Journal and Official and Other Documents Furnished by Him Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ...horse in the brigade but three, and that other brigades lost heavily. He claimed the capture of two guns from Sheridan, but these were from Carpenter's battery of Davis' division, and this fact is decisive of General Polk's mistake in reference to the position of General Davis. General Sheridan lost no guns from his first position. Whatever may have been the exact order of the recession of Davis and Sheridan, it is certain that neither held position long after the third assault of the enemy. The conditions of their retreat, however, were different, though the cause of it was common--the battle line on the left of Sheridan was intact, while the brigades of Davis' division were exposed on all sides. Colonel Post, under the pressure of Cleburne's division, moved-directly to the Nashville turnpike, in rear of the armv. Colonel Carlin held his ground until the destruction of his brigade was imminent, when his regiments broke to the rear from his left flank. TptyVi-a' hpttery moyed_acros8 open fields to wooded ground, where General Davis attempted to form a new line. As_ lajiinIa_broken regiments reached this position, they were disposed to support this battery. Woodruff retreated through th woods in hia rear, and then turned and charged the pursuing enemy with such force that he regained his original position, but being entirely unsupported, could not hold it. Through false information as to the purpose of General Davis, and danger from the overlapping lines of the enemy, Carlin abandoned the new line before Wnnrlmff ronned it, and both brigades crossed the_Wilkinson turnpike and joined a portion of Johnson's division, which, having made repeated eflforta to withstand the enemy had fallen bflfk to thf right of TIl'"'fl1...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 172 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 318g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236629426
  • 9781236629425