A History of Architecture for the Student, Craftsman, and Amateur; Being a Comparative View of the Historical Styles from the Earliest Period

A History of Architecture for the Student, Craftsman, and Amateur; Being a Comparative View of the Historical Styles from the Earliest Period

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...and its bells' roar." Notre Dame, Paris, 1163-1214 (No. 93), the oldest of French Gothic cathedrals. Notice the numerous points of support, and the sexpartite vaulting (No. 85 D) of the central nave; the small projection of transepts, these being practically in a line with the side aisles; the chevtt arrangement, with its double aisles, and exterior chapels carried round. The west front (No. 93) is the grandest composition in France, if not of the whole style. The western gable to the nave is hidden by a pierced screen, connecting the two western towers. The three deeply recessed western portals, the band of statues in niches, and the circular wheel window are all characteristic features. Amiens Cathedral, 1220-1257 (No. 95).--In plan the typical French cathedral is referred to in the Comparative Table. Coutances Cathedral (No. 96).--Erected in the early part of the thirteenth century. Specially famous for the two western towers and spires, and the octagonal lantern over 1 he crossing of nave and transept. Bourges Cathedral is chiefly remarkable as possessing no transepts, and for its shortness in comparison with its width. It has five aisles in three different heights (No. 99), in this respect resembling Milan Cathedral (N0.98), though in a different gradation. The absence of transepts with an apsidal termination, and the great height, gives to the cathedral the appearance of a great hulk. The view westwards from the east end is striking, owing to the picturesque confusion of innumerable flying buttresses, pinnacles, and other features. DOMESTIC WORK. Many fine examples remain throughout France. Ex.: Houses at Caudebec. The House of Jacques Coeur, Bourges. This splendid example of the house of a great merchant prince of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 100 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236947576
  • 9781236947574