A History of Architecture in Italy from the Time of Constantine to the Dawn of the Renaissance Volume 2

A History of Architecture in Italy from the Time of Constantine to the Dawn of the Renaissance Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1901 edition. Excerpt: ...flying buttresses connecting these with the outer walls of the chapels of the lower church. The arches, however, abut upon the vertical buttresses at so low a point that the reinforcement they bring can hardly be very effective. The design of the interior is quite unlike that of any preceding building in Italy, yet it would be hard to point out its prototype in France, England, or Germany. The whole height is about sixty feet, yet such is the breadth of the arches which divide the wall that their height is nearly equal to that of the piers from which they spring. In each arch of the nave is a high and narrow two-light pointed window, the lights being separated, not by a column, as has heretofore been the invariable rule in Italy, but by a true Gothic chamfered mullion. A similar window occupies each face of the apse. In the transept ends this window is doubled, and the two pairs are brought together under a broad pointed bearing-arch with a quatrefoil in the head. The wall below the windows is broken only by the dividing piers, and is of superior thickness, so that at the point where the wall is thinned, sufficient breadth is left for a narrow gallery, which runs quite around the church, cutting through the masonry of the deep wall arches. In the side walls of transepts and choir, where there are no windows, this gallery is faced by a light and graceful arcade of narrow cusped arches, on slender columns with foliage capitals of a distinctly French type; and above the arcade is a second gallery, protected by a low fence wall. It will be seen that the whole design of this interior is of the simplest character. Except for the gallery arcade even the stern Cistercians could not have built with more severe restraint, so far as the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236799860
  • 9781236799869