The History and Antiquities of the Collegiate and Cathedral Church of St. Patrick Near Dublin, from It Foundation in 1190, to the Year 1819; Comprising a Topographical Account of the Lands and Parishes and Biographical Memoirs of Its Deans

The History and Antiquities of the Collegiate and Cathedral Church of St. Patrick Near Dublin, from It Foundation in 1190, to the Year 1819; Comprising a Topographical Account of the Lands and Parishes and Biographical Memoirs of Its Deans

By (author) 

List price: US$63.30

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1820 edition. Excerpt: ...Our inmost secrets to our foes: That common forms were not design'd Directors to a noble mind. Now, said the nymph, to let you see My actions with your rules agree; That I can vulgar forms despise, And have no secrets to disguise; I knew, by what you said and writ, How dangerous tilings were men of wit; You caution'd me against their charms, But never gave me equal arms: Your lessons found the weakest part, Aim'd at the head, and reach'd the heart." Upon these lines the learned Peer expatiates, without exhibiting the least desire to understand their meaning, in the following words. "His rules were certainly of a most extraordinary kind. He taught her, that vice, as soon as it defied shame, was immediately changed into virtue. That vulgar forms were not binding upon certain choice spirits, to whom either the writings, or tbe persons of men of wit were acceptable. She heard the lesson with attention, and imbibed the philosophy with eagerness. The maxims suited her exalted turn of mind. She imagined that if the theory appeared so charming, the practice must be much more delightful. The close connection of soul and body seemed to require, in the eye of a female philosopher, that each should succeed the other in all pleasurable enjoyments. The former had been sufficiently regaled, why must the latter remain unsatisfied? 4 Nature, ' said Vanessa, 1 abhors a vacuum, and nature ought always to be obeyed." She communicated these sentiments to her tutor, but he seemed not to comprehend her meaning, nor to conceive the distinctio rationis that had taken rise in his own school. He answered her in the nonessential moda. He talked of friendship, of the delights of reason, of gratitude, respect and esteem. He almost preached upon virtue, and he...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 576 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 30mm | 1,016g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236616782
  • 9781236616784