The History and Antiquities of the Anglo-Saxon Church; Containing an Account of Its Origin, Government, Doctrines, Worship, Revenues, and Clerical and Monastic Institutions

The History and Antiquities of the Anglo-Saxon Church; Containing an Account of Its Origin, Government, Doctrines, Worship, Revenues, and Clerical and Monastic Institutions

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1858 edition. Excerpt: ...first care of the founder or foundress of one of these establishments was to provide for the religious wants, not only of the sisterhood, but also of the tenants and labourers located on the domain. With this view a church was erected, frequently on a large and magnificent scale;2 and contiguous to the church a range of buildings for the accommodation of the priests, deacons, and inferior clerks, whose ministry would be required in the daily and solemn performance of the service, and in the office of imparting religious instruction and spiritual aid to the neighbouring inhabitants. The discipline adopted in this second monastery was 1 Bed. 1. iii. c. 24; 1. iv. o. 23. 3 See the description of one of these churches in Alcuin's works, ii. p. 549. the same as in similar episcopal and abbatial establishments; its inmates were subject to the same regulations, and bound to perform the same duties. But they still looked up to the abbess as their head; for her religious profession had not deprived her of her secular rights. She was the "lady/' they were her "men," living on her property, and supported by her bounty. Their immediate superior was of her appointment, and through him they received her commands. It may, perhaps, be thought that the proximity of the two monasteries might prove an occasion of danger to the virtue of their inhabitants; but it was hoped that the mortified life to which they had bound themselves by the most solemn vows, would render them superior to temptation; and to eschew even the suspicion of evil, the strictest precautions were enforced to confine the sisters within the spacious precincts of their convent, and to prevent any man from entering within their inclosure, except it were on some particular occasion, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 124 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 236g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123656104X
  • 9781236561046