The History of Ancient Greece; Its Colonies and Conquests from the Earliest Accounts Till the Division of the Macedonian Empire in the East. Including the History of Literature, Philosophy, and the Fine Arts Volume 5-6

The History of Ancient Greece; Its Colonies and Conquests from the Earliest Accounts Till the Division of the Macedonian Empire in the East. Including the History of Literature, Philosophy, and the Fine Arts Volume 5-6

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1820 edition. Excerpt: ... some unexplained wound given to his pride, had taken offence at his uncle, and begun to tamper with Cassander, to whom he afterwards revolted.65 From the East, Antigonus was informed by Nicanor his governor of Media, that the provinces of Upper Asia were in the most dangerous commotion; that part of them was already lost, and that the speediest exertions were requisite for saving the remainder." '- Diodorus, 1. xix. s. 10O. ' Ibid. 1. xx. 1.19. " Ibid. 1. xix. 9. 90. et seq. Chap. The victory obtained by Ptolemy over Demei f, trius at Gaza, was attended with a consequence which neither of these generals had foreseen. Seleucus, who had so important a share in that brilliant action, and whose activity never slumbered, availed himself of the good fortune and gratitude of his ally, to obtain from him a body of troops for invading his ancient satrapy of Babylonia, of which three years before he had been divested by Antigonus. During four years that he had formerly governed there, the vigilance and impartial justice of Seleucus had endeared him to the natives. 67 Imitating the liberal policy of Alexander, he indulged the Asiatics in their inveterate habits of thought and action; gradually engrafting, however, on the oriental stock, those simple yet solid improvements, of which daily experience clearly evinced the utility. With little regard to national distinctions, he acknowledged those chiefly of personal merit. The vanquished were protected in common with the victors; and both were promoted in just proportion to their zeal and ability in the public service. With energy equal to his ambition, the love of power in Seleucus was called royalty of soul. M His praises were highly sounded among Greeks and Barbarians; and as he was younger...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 302 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 16mm | 544g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236533100
  • 9781236533104