A History of Agriculture and Prices in England; From the Year After the Oxford Parliament (1259) to the Commencement of the Continental War (1793) Volume 1

A History of Agriculture and Prices in England; From the Year After the Oxford Parliament (1259) to the Commencement of the Continental War (1793) Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1866 edition. Excerpt: ...out in the morning between St. Barnabas' day and St. Martin's if there be a white dew and cobwebs on the ground, but wait till the sun has purified the ground. Do not let them drink stagnant or dark-coloured water. Before they. leave the fold let the shepherd drive them for some time gently round the enclosure; they will then leave their compost on the spot, instead of dropping it in the road. After lambing, the teats of the ewes should be shorn, as otherwise the wool is apt to get into the stomach of the lambs, and is very likely to kill them. As regards disease, I should advise, he says, that on SS. Simon and Jude's day, Oct. 28th, two of the best and two of the worst be killed and examined. If they are sound, well; if not, sell as expeditiously as possible, take good security for your debt, and buy again at Hock day, i. e. a week or fortnight after Easterf. There are, however, several means by which shepherds profess to discover the existence of rot. 1. They look at the veins under the eyelid; if they are red the sheep is sound, if white, unsound. 2. They try the wool on the ribs; if it holds firmly to the skin the sign is good, if it tears off' easily, it is bad. 3. If the skin on rubbing reddens, the sheep is sound, if it keeps pale the animal is rotten. 4. About All Saints' day, Nov. 1, if the hoar frost in the morning is found to cling to the wool it is a good sign, but if it be melted it is a sign that the animal is suffering from an unnatural heat, and that it is probably unsound. If," says my author, " one of your sheep dies, put the flesh at once into water, and keep it there from daybreak to three o'clock (nones), then hang it up to drain thoroughly, salt it and dry it; it will do for your labourers." While the sheep...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 196 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 358g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236524047
  • 9781236524041