A History of the Administration of the Royal Navy and of Merchant Shipping in Relation to the Navy; From MDIX to MDCLX, with an Introduction Treating of the Preceding Period Volume 1

A History of the Administration of the Royal Navy and of Merchant Shipping in Relation to the Navy; From MDIX to MDCLX, with an Introduction Treating of the Preceding Period Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...'that could not keep it from decay.' For building a new ship in place of the Bonaventure 5700 had been allowed but, although 1700 had been paid on account of it, no new vessel had been commenced, and though this same ship 'was broken up above seven years past yet the King hath paid 63 yearly for keeping her.' Further, 'the Advantage was burnt about five years since and yet keepeth at the charge of 104, 9s 5d; the Charles was disposed of in Scotland two years since and costeth 60, 16s 1od for keeping.' For repairing the Merhonour, Defiance, Vanguard, and Dreadnought, 23,500 had been paid The Commissioners acted by Letters Patent of I2th February 1619. They were Sir Lionel Cranfield, Sir Tnos. Weston, Sir John Wolstenholme, Sir Thos. Smith, Nicholas Fortescue, John Osborne, Francis Goston, Richard Sutton, Wm. Pitt, Sir John Coke, Thos. Norreys, and Wm. Burrell. State Papers, Dom., c and ci, 3. 'for which eight new ships might have been built as the accounts of the East India Company do prove; yet all this while the King's ships decayed and if the Merhonour were repaired she was left so imperfect that before her finishing she begins again to decay.' In nine years 108,000 had been charged for cordage, and the Commissioners express their intention of reducing the expenditure on this item by two-thirds. At a later date some of the Commissioners themselves did not escape suspicion. In 1623 Sir John Coke, still the leading member, wrote to Conway that all went well until the Algiers voyage, but that he then suspected that some of his colleagues were selling their own wares to the government. They, of course, denied the allegation when Coke was frank enough to openly tax them with it, but 'ever since I carried a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 172 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 318g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236560566
  • 9781236560568