Historical View of the Progress of Discovery on the More Northern Coasts of America, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time

Historical View of the Progress of Discovery on the More Northern Coasts of America, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1842 edition. Excerpt: ...to take an aim was impossible; and the rein-deer, partridges, and other game flew or bounded past in joyousness and security, while the unhappy beings who beheld them were gaunt with hunger. The winter was closing in with all its horrors; it became daily more difficult to procure fuel, the labour of cutting and carrying the logs being so grievous that only Dr. Kichardson and Hepburn could undertake it; and to scrape the ground for bones, and to cook this miserable meal, was all Captain Franklin could accomplish. On 1st November, the doctor obtained some tripe de roche; and as Peltier and Samandre were in the last stage of exhaustion, it was hoped a little of the soup might revive them. All was in vain; they tasted a few spoonfuls, but soon complained of a soreness in their throats, and both died in the course of the night, apparently without pain. To inter the bodies, or even carry them to the river, was a task for which the united strength of the survivors was inadequate; all they could do was to remove them into an opposite part of the house; and the living and the dead remained in awful contiguity under the same roof. The party was now reduced to four, --Franklin, Richardson, Hepburn, and Adam. The last had become dreadfully low since the death of his companions, and could not bear to be left alone for a moment. Their stock of bones was exhausted, and in a short time it was evident that the severity of the frost must render the gathering of the tripe de roche impossible. Under these circumstances, with death by famine approaching every hour, this little band of pious and brave men were supported by an unwavering reliance on the mercy of God. "We read prayers," says Captain Franklin, "and a portion of the New Testament in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 128 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236640152
  • 9781236640154