An Historical View of the English Governement from the Settlement of the Saxons in Britain to the Revolution in 1688 4. Ed Volume 2

An Historical View of the English Governement from the Settlement of the Saxons in Britain to the Revolution in 1688 4. Ed Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1818 edition. Excerpt: ...to have a voice in parliament, the differences in their condition occasioned the same, or even a greater diversity in the mode of choosing their representatives; and, in a long course of time, many other varieties were added, from the operation of accidental circumstances. In some towns, therefore, the representatives were chosen by a considerable part, in others, by a very small proportion, of the inhabitants; in many, by a few individuals, and these, in particular cases, directed, perhaps, or influenced, by a single person. Two sorts of inequality were thus produced in the representation of the mercantile and manufacturing interest; the one from the very different magnitude of the boroughs, who. sent, for the most part, an equal number of representatives: the other, from the very van.:1. R different number of voters, by whom, in each borough, those representatives were chosen. But this inequality, whatever bad consequences may have flowed from it in a later period, was originally an object of little attention, and excited no jealousy or complaint. The primitive burgesses were sent into parliament for the purpose chiefly of making a bargain with the crown, concerning the taxes to be imposed upon their own constituents; and the representatives of each borough had merely the power of consenting to the sum paid by that community which they represented, without interfering in what was paid by any other. It was of no consequence, therefore, to any one borough, that another, of inferior size or opulence, should have as many representatives in the national assembly: since those representatives, as far as. taxes were concerned, could only protect their own corporation, but were incapable of inj uri-ng or hurting their neighbours. So far were the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 92 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236737938
  • 9781236737939