A Historical Sketch of the Conflicts Between Jesuits and Seculars in the Reign of Queen Elizabeth; With a Reprint of Christopher Bagshaw's 'True Relation of the Faction Begun at Wisbich'

A Historical Sketch of the Conflicts Between Jesuits and Seculars in the Reign of Queen Elizabeth; With a Reprint of Christopher Bagshaw's 'True Relation of the Faction Begun at Wisbich'

By (author) 

List price: US$21.33

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...brought that priest into some danger' (Briefe Notes, p. 58). Parsons in his Manifestation of course denies the 'trick, ' and at the same time, more suo, lets us have his own modest opinion of Mr. Dolman: 'The author of the book neither knew any priest to be named Dolman when he wrote that book, nor so much as thought on him, but alluding to the word of the Consents to act as Mediator. 27 We had heard before of the sayd letter and rules sent to Fa. Garnet: but (as we then told M. Dolman) we could neuer come to the sight of them: and therefore we desired him to be a meanes, that we might haue the perusing of them. Whereunto he did very willingly yeeld; as thinking our motion therein very reasonable: and thereupon going to maister Southworth, he so preuayled with him, as that he the sayd maister Dolman brought them vnto vs: which when we had read, we were much perplexed, finding our credits to be greatly touched by them. Howbeit, maister Doctor Bagshaw, in a very mild and charitable sort, did then desire maister Dolman, that by his mediation he might haue conference with Fa. Weston: promising, that he would be a meanes, that this controuersie should be ended to his honor & credit, and to a further increase of amity and charity, then euer there had bin for a long time amongst vs. Maister Dolman being a glad man to heare so much from him, dealt with Fa, Weston accordingly: whome he found so stifle, as he could by no meanes perswade him to admit of that godly offer: notwithstanding it was made vnto him thrice; and so oft pressed by him the Scripture, vir dolorum, he called himself Dole-man, in respect of the grief and sorrow he bore in his heart for the affliction and calamity of his country. Afterwards it fell out that there was a priest in England...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 124 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 236g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236487869
  • 9781236487865