Historical Researches on the Conquest of Peru, Mexico, Bogota, Natchez, and Talomeco; In the Thirteenth Century, by the Mongols, Accompanied with Elephants and the Local Agreement of History and Tradition, with the Remains of Elephants

Historical Researches on the Conquest of Peru, Mexico, Bogota, Natchez, and Talomeco; In the Thirteenth Century, by the Mongols, Accompanied with Elephants and the Local Agreement of History and Tradition, with the Remains of Elephants

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1827 edition. Excerpt: ...This map has no pretension to any thing more than as a general guide to the ancient history, Clavigero, we may presume, being the best authority for the division of the ancient states. the capital, was an independent and hostile republic. Cholula, still nearer, was a recent acquisition. Tepeiacac, thirty leagues from Mexico, was a separate state. Mechuacan, whose frontier was within forty leagues, was implacable to the Mexican name. Thus circumscribed, we must moderate the high ideas formed from Spanish historians." We will now endeavour to give the reader a sketch of Anahuac, the old name of New Spain, before the arrival of the Mexicans. "The Toltecas," says Clavigero, vol. i. p. 84, "are the oldest nation of which we have any knowledge, and that is very imperfect." Robertson, ii. 293. "When the Mexicans arrived in Anahuac, says Clavigero, they found it full of large and beautiful cities." Vol. i. 416. No proofs of this assertion appear in any ruins of dwellings built of solid materials. The ruins of Mitla, and those near Guatimala, are probably not older than the thirteenth or fourteenth century, according to Humboldt, Vol. ii. 158). The ruins of Mitla are ornamented with Greek and Arabesque borders, very similar to such as are seen on Chinese and Japanese card boxes and counters, and also on the dresses of the Incas. 268 ARRIVAL OF THE TOLTECS. CA. VII. They are supposed to have come from the more northern parts of America, or rather from the most eastern parts of Asia, to the western shores of America. This opinion is supported by the general tradition of those nations, which asserts, that their ancestors came into Anahuac from the countries of the north and north-west; also by the remains of many ancient...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 98 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 191g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236612884
  • 9781236612885