An Historical Research Respecting the Opinions of the Founders of the Republic on Negroes as Slaves, as Citizens, and as Soldiers; Read Before the Ma

An Historical Research Respecting the Opinions of the Founders of the Republic on Negroes as Slaves, as Citizens, and as Soldiers; Read Before the Ma

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1862 edition. Excerpt: ...Congress, --let that urbanity, which I trust will distinguish America, and the fTMk necessity of national defence, --let all these things operate on their minds: they will search that paper, and see if they have power of manumission. And have they not, Sir? Have they not power to provide for the general defence and welfare? May they not think that these call for the abolition of slavery? May they not pronounce all slaves free? and will they not be warranted by that power? This is no ambiguous implication or logical deduction. The paper speaks to the point. They have the power, in clear, unequivocal terms, and will clearly and certainly exercise it. As much as I deplore slavery, I see that prudence forbids its abolition. I deny that the General Government ought to set them free, because a decided majority of the States have not the ties of sympathy and fellow-feeling for those whose interest would be affected by their emancipation. The majority of Congress is to the North, and the slaves are to the South."--Elliot's Debates, vol. iii. pp. 589, 590. Governor Randolph had been a member of the Federal Convention; but he had refused to sign the Constitution, wishing to be left free to oppose or to advocate its adoption when it came before his State for consideration. He afterwards, however, saw, that on the ratification of the Constitution hung all hopes of preserving the Union, and he now gave it his hearty support. He thus replied to Mr. Henry: --" That honorable gentleman, and some others, have in-Edmund sisted that the abolition of slavery will result from it, and Randolpt at the same time have complained that it encourages its continuation. The inconsistency proves, in some degree, the futility of their arguments. But, if it be not...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 66 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 136g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123650609X
  • 9781236506092