Historical Reminiscences of the Early Times in Marlborough, Massachusetts; And Prominent Events from 1860 to 1910, Including Brief Allusions to Many Individuals and an Account of the Celebration of the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary

Historical Reminiscences of the Early Times in Marlborough, Massachusetts; And Prominent Events from 1860 to 1910, Including Brief Allusions to Many Individuals and an Account of the Celebration of the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...dimensions for so large a familv; barns and outbuildings in abundance, and all of them well finished and furnished. Uncle and Aunt Weeks were what was considered in ye olden times, wealthy people, and to the poor of the Methodist church they were bountiful benefactors. It will be interesting to manv to state here that Ephraim Fairbanks, a stout, robust young man from the state of Maine was the foreman on the farm. He had charge of the little armv of hired men and bovs on the place and must have been popular and efficient, as he married one of their foster daughters, Miss Hunt, who was one of a large number of brothers and sisters of one family that tbis benevolent couple adopted and brought up. Mary Elizabeth (Howe) Keyes was born in the east part of Marlborough on the Boston road near where formerly stood the Howe--Sawin-Monroe--Wilson Tavern. Near that location stood the John Howe garrison of 1711, and not on the Concord road as stated in the History of Marlborough. This John Howe of the above named garrison was a brother to Elizabeth Howe. He died 1754 aged 82 years. Deacon Thomas Keyes and wife attended church ten or more years ago in the third meeting house, high school common and 30 years in the fourth meeting house, same place. We find the head stones of Deacon Keves and his consort Elizabeth Howe Keyes in the old Spring Hill cemeterv. ELIZABETH HOWE, TAKEN CAPTIVE BY THE INDIANS. The story of Elizabeth Howe was, that at seventeen years of age she was taken captive. Her father, John Howe, Jr., who married Elizabeth Ward, was killed by the Indians before his daughter was ten months of age. Her mother. Elizabeth Howe, married the next year 167l, Captain Henry Kerley and settled near the center of Marlborough. (Cyrus Eelton the antiquarian...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 148 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 277g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236486668
  • 9781236486660