An Historical and Political Discourse of the Laws & Government of England; From the First Times to the End of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth. with a Vindication of the Antient Way of Parliaments in England, Collected from Some Manuscript

An Historical and Political Discourse of the Laws & Government of England; From the First Times to the End of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth. with a Vindication of the Antient Way of Parliaments in England, Collected from Some Manuscript

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1682 edition. Excerpt: ...upon the People, so far as the influence of the King's Wer extends. And therefore it is not beyond the Sphear of the Par iament to interpose and qualifie that influence, so as it may be for the _ general good of the whole Kingdom. For many times Kings are either above or beneath themselves; and in such cases, if the Council be of the King's suit, he is of the deeper dye, and proves more Malignant to the People. Edward the Third, growing into great opinion in the World, his proportion exceeds his own portion, and the Peoples good 14 E.g. n.55. wills to boot; they think the fault is in the Privy-Council, and an Inquisition is set upon it. So also they do in his fiftieth year, when he ' grows downward. And the like in the beginning of Richard the Seconds Reign, he being nowaYouth, and therefore unstable in his Resoluti ons, and unable to make Election. So as upon the whole matter, if the King fall short in point of Judgment or Resolution, or inordinate in 3Rich.2.n.34, his Affections; but more especially where they observe the major, SRiCh-Z-n-W-or more considerable part of the Council to draw towards a designe; 2 ii;_, _n, 9_ in such cases as these, the Parliament, as its own duty, undertook to settle a good Council about the King's person, that might advise him The Government of g ' Kingr of England. il during their recess. For the Privy-Council is never more it self, than when, it is an Epitome of the Commoncounczsil of the Kingdom. In like manner such Officers asconcern execution of Law and Counsel, are as narrowly to be enquired into: for if their motion be irregular, it is less material what the rule be. The Parliament therefore held it their duty _to interpose in the Election of grand Officers of the Kin dom, such as are the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 140 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 263g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236858735
  • 9781236858733