Historical and Linguistic Studies in Literature Related to the New Testament; Linguistic and Exegetical Studies Volume 2, No. 1

Historical and Linguistic Studies in Literature Related to the New Testament; Linguistic and Exegetical Studies Volume 2, No. 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ...of Philo. The fact is that he uses it on a far larger scale than does the writer of the Fourth Gospel, only he does not take over the word; another title used by Philo of the Logos was already in Christian use and served his purposes better--the Son of God. The striking designations of Christ and the functions attributed to him in Heb. 1:2,3 mav be found in the Book of Wisdom and in Philo, there having reference to Wisdom personified and the Logos. Of Wisdom it is said in a notable passage (Wis. 7:26): For she is an effulgence (4irai)7aoia) of eternal light, And an immaculate mirror of God's energy, And an image of his goodness. Philo says that every man in regard to his intellect is related to the divine reason, being an airavyaa.fux of that blessed nature;1 and that the irrev/ia. in man is a certain type and xapo.KTrjp of the divine power, man in his reason being the image of God.3 A favorite conception with Philo is that of the Logos as the agent through whom God fashioned the world. In De Planlat. 5 he says: 6 xaP'lKTVP "w at&ios Xdyos. In Heb. 1:6 the Son is designated vpoiToTOKos; so Philo often calls the Logos God's irpanoyovos vlos (as in De Agricult. 12). Just as Philo does not scruple to call the Logos a second God (o Sevrepos (r)eds),3 though dependent on the one original God, so the writer of Hebrews applies to Christ passages from the Psalms in which God is addressed, setting forth his eternal royal dignity and creative role (1:8-12); yet what Christ did was part of God's own plan and under his direction (2:9,10; 5:4, 5). In Philo the Logos is not only the mediator of creation, but also of 1 De Mundi Opif. 51. 1 Quod Det. Pot. Insid. 23. 3 Found only in one passage, which is preserved by Eusebius, .show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 50 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236807375
  • 9781236807373