Historical Collections of New Jersey, Past and Present; Containing a General Collection of the Most Interesting Facts, Traditions, Biographical Sketches, Anecdotes, Etc., Relating to the History and Antiquities, with Geographical

Historical Collections of New Jersey, Past and Present; Containing a General Collection of the Most Interesting Facts, Traditions, Biographical Sketches, Anecdotes, Etc., Relating to the History and Antiquities, with Geographical

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1868 edition. Excerpt: ...hastily retreated. The baggage and artillery of the British troops were detained at the bridge nearly an hour before it could be made passable. The troops, however, were ordered to dash through the stream, (then swollen and filled with running ice, and about breast high, ) and press forward as rapidly as possible toward New Brunswick. The officer who commanded the detachment ordered to destroy the bridge, is said to have been Major (afterwards Col.) John Kelly, of Pennsylvania, who died about the year 1835. After the British appeared in sight, it was necessary that some part of the bridge should be cut away, --which was an extremely hazardous service under the fire of the enemy. Maj. Kelly, disdaining to order another to do what some might say he would not do himself, bravely took the axe and commenced cutting off the logs on which the planks of the bridge were laid. Several balls struck into the last log he was chopping, and on which he stood, when it broke down sooner than he expected, and he fell with it into the swollen stream. His men, not believing it possible for him to escape, immediately fled. Maj. Kelly, by great exertion, got out of the water and followed after them; but being unarmed and encumbered with frozen clothing, he was taken prisoner by a. British soldier. On the near approach of the British troops to Princeton, their advance division was suddenly brought to a stand by the discharge of a large 32-pounder. This piece, now in the central part of the college grounds, formerly belonged to the British; which Washington was unable to take with him when he left Princeton, on account of its carriage being broken. It was left on a temporary breastwork, in the vicinity of the present residence of Dr. Samuel Miller, near the west end of.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 288 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 517g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236487591
  • 9781236487599