An Historical Account of the London Institution; Including Bibliographical Notices and a Synoptical View of the Library; With a Sketch of the Scientific History of the Establishment, and of the Various Courses of Lectures Which Have Been

An Historical Account of the London Institution; Including Bibliographical Notices and a Synoptical View of the Library; With a Sketch of the Scientific History of the Establishment, and of the Various Courses of Lectures Which Have Been

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1835 edition. Excerpt: ...through the kindness of Mr. Paws, by the use of a large battery, constructed under his directions for the London Institution, and containing a pair of plates of about two hundred square feet." It was exhibited and employed by Mr. Brande in the latter part of his last lecture, in the course of 1823; and in 1825 it was brought forward by Dr. Birkbeck, and again by Mr. Brande; under the name of the lllagnetomator. The distinct and independent invention of a similar apparatus appears to have occurred about the same time to Dr. Seebeck of Berlin. The instrument invented by Mr. Pepys, as well as the Great Battery, has been virtually destroyed by frequent use, from the repeated action of the solvents employed. riments, the nature and relations of Common Electricity, Voltaic Electricity, Electro-Magnetism, and Magneto-Electricity. Cnnmrsrnr. The general nature of the principles and powers of Chemical action having been succinctly explained in Mr. Brande's opening course of lectures;--a regular introduction to the details of the science, especially with relation to the properties of ponderable substances, was commenced in 1820 by Mr. Richard Phillips, F. R. S., a chemist of high reputation, especially in the department of analysis. There were not any lectures given at the Institution in 1821, but upon their being resumed in the following year, Mr. Phillips delivered a series of thirteen discourses upon Analytical Chemistry. In these he exhibited the various methods of performing chemical analysis, with the most striking properties of the agents employed and the substances elicited therein, with respect to the following subjects of analysis;--namey, Atmospheric Air, I/Vater, Sea-water, Earthy Bodies, and Animal and Vegetable products....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236872061
  • 9781236872067