An Historical Account of Inventions and Discoveries in Those Arts and Sciences, Which Are of Utility or Ornament to Man, Lend Assistance to Human Comfort

An Historical Account of Inventions and Discoveries in Those Arts and Sciences, Which Are of Utility or Ornament to Man, Lend Assistance to Human Comfort

By (author) 

List price: US$32.52

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1820 edition. Excerpt: ... additament, Puris, 1685, seems not to be ill-grounded, when he supposes the ancient Germans had learned this sport of the Scyths. How common hawking is, even at this day, in Ming-relia and Dagestan, the abovacited writer of the latest account of Calm and Astracan, &c. (p. 178 and 315, ) will satisfy the reader. The Tumm in Siberia make use of three-sorts of falcons. The first is called in their tongue, hkarlschegu aholphei, or tsungar, which is the best and most beautiful sort; these falcons are ash-coloured, and some speckled white, and pretty large. The second sort they call uguginala. The third toracktschiri. Whichever sort they be, it is necessary to make them lit for sport whilst they are young, which is done by these people in the following manner: after a falcon has been well fed, and is fat, they give them the bigness of a pepper-corn of a root they call ack-chirgulr, put among some flesh, chopped small; this root is of an emetic quality, and has its effect upon the birds: in the next place, they take a. piece of woollen felt, of the bigness of a. nut, this they mince among some flesh, make a little ball of it, and make the bird eat it; this done, they cause him to be carried upon a man's hand from nine to twelve days, to prevent his sleeping: after which time, thcyimix some calmus among his meat, and by that time he is used to the falconer. owever, before they venture him at large, they make him start and return within small compass. It is to be observed, that the Tartan never stroke their falcons over the head and back, which they believe makes them shy. The use the same method with eagles."--Von Struhlenbcrg' Hist.-Geog. Description Qf CZ: North and North-Eaat qf Europe, tfc, p. 362. 5 Prazdo fuit...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 206 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 376g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123698790X
  • 9781236987907