Hinds' Precedents of the House of Representatives of the United States Including References to Provisions of the Constitution; The Laws and Decisions of the United States Senate Volume 5

Hinds' Precedents of the House of Representatives of the United States Including References to Provisions of the Constitution; The Laws and Decisions of the United States Senate Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...yeas and nays, the Speaker announces a result different from that shown by the roll, the status of the question must be determined by the vote as actually recorded.--On July 26, 1886,1 Mr. William C. Oates, of Alabama, rising immediately after the reading of the Journal, said: Mr. Speaker, I desire to correct the Journal wherein it states that on the last bill under consideration at the evening session on Saturday, on the motion of the gentleman from Indiana Mr. Cobb for the previous question on the bill and pending amendments, it was announced that no quorum voted thereon. That point was made, and the House, under a misapprehension, supposed it was so. In fact, a quorum had voted, and the previous question was ordered. The Record shows there were 128 yeas and 37 nays, making 165 votes. That was the fact; but the House, on the suggestion of the gentleman from Pennsylvania Mr. Boyle that no quorum had voted, accepted that as correct, although, in fact, a quorum had voted and the previous question was ordered. The Speaker' said: The Journal will be corrected in accordance with the statement of the gentleman from Alabama. The Chair desires to state, as a matter of justice to the tally clerk, that in recording the affirmative vote in the column assigned for that purpose upon the sheet, when that vote had reached 49 he put down the figures 49 and called two or three more names before there was any other vote in the affirmative. When the next gentleman voted in the affirmative, the tally clerk, looking back to his previous figures, took the 9 for a 4--and it looks very much like a 4, as the gentleman from Alabama will see if he examines it--and therefore recorded the next vote as 45, when it should have been 50; and that error was continued until the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 668 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 34mm | 1,175g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236637739
  • 9781236637734