Hindoostan; Containing a Description of the Religion, Manners, Customs, Trades, Arts, Sciences, Literature, Diversions &C. of the Hindoos Illustr. Wit

Hindoostan; Containing a Description of the Religion, Manners, Customs, Trades, Arts, Sciences, Literature, Diversions &C. of the Hindoos Illustr. Wit

By (author) 

List price: US$14.14

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1827 edition. Excerpt: ... became liquid, and mixed again with the water of the pond. She could never afterwards carry any more home, without the assistance of a vessel. Chamada Guini hence discovered that his wife had ceased to be pure, and, in the excess of his rage, he ordered his son to drag her to the place of execution, and to cut off her head. This command was obeyed; but Parassurama grieved so much for the loss of his mother, that Chamada Guini told him to go and join her head again to her body, and to recite a prayer, which he taught him, in her ear, assuring him that she would then revive. The son hastened to follow these directions; but, by a singular mistake, he joined the head of his mother to the body of a parchi, who had been executed for her crimes--a monstrous union, which combined in Mariatta the virtues of a goddess and the vices of a prostitute. The. goddess, rendered impure by this mixture, was expelled from her habitation, and committed all sorts of cruelties. The deverhels, observing the ravages she was making, appeased her anger, by conferring on her the power of curing the small-pox, and promising that prayers should be offered to her on account of that disease. INCARNATIONS OF VISHNU. There is a part of the mythology of India, which seems to be blended with the history of that country, and of which, for this reason, we think it right to treat somewhat more circumstantially. It may be compared with that of the heroic ages of Greece. This part relates to the different awatars of Vishnu, or his incarnations and appearances on earth. The first of these awatars has a reference to that general deluge, of which all nations have preserved some tradition. Vishnu, we are told, metamorphosed himself into a fish, to save king Sattiaviraden and his wife, ..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236537548
  • 9781236537546