Hindoostan; Containing a Description of the Religion, Manners, Customs, Trades, Arts, Sciences, Literature, Diversions &C. of the Hindoos Illustr. Wit

Hindoostan; Containing a Description of the Religion, Manners, Customs, Trades, Arts, Sciences, Literature, Diversions &C. of the Hindoos Illustr. Wit

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1827 edition. Excerpt: ...so vigilant. Huts of this kind will stand forty or fifty years in spite of storms and rain, such is the solidity of the earth of which they are built. The houses, properly so called, that is to say, such as are inhabited by the great and the wealthy, and which are to be seen only in cities and towns, are of brick, plastered with a kind of lime make of sea-shells, which is of a brilliant white, and in appearance resembles marble. This composition is not only agreeable to the eye, but forms a cement of incredible solidity. The roofs are constructed of strong rafters of palm-tree wood, and covered with pantiles. The front is generally adorned with columns of brick or wood, with bases and capitals, which support the projection of the roof, while their bases also support a terrace or gallery that runs along one or more sides of the building, and is considered as a public place. Thus, in situations where there are no choultries, travellers halt under these galleries, cook their provisions, and stay there as long as they please, without asking permission of the master of the house. The "principal houses are commonly two or three stories high, and consist of four ranges of building, forming a perfect square, with a paved court in the middle. In the fore-court is another colonnade, with a gallery corresponding with that before mentioned. The apartments are between the two terraces, VOL. IV. L and most of them are very dark, because they have no light but what is admitted from the court: for there are no windows on the side next to the street or road. Here the men abide during the day, but at night they take the air on the terraces, where the women are. not permitted to accompany them. The bed-chamber is at the bottom of the house; there too are the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 24 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 64g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236534107
  • 9781236534101