The Highlands and Western Isles of Scotland, Containing Descriptions of Their Scenery and Antiquities, with an Account of the Political History; Present Condition of the People, &C Founded on a Series of Annual Journeys Between Volume 1

The Highlands and Western Isles of Scotland, Containing Descriptions of Their Scenery and Antiquities, with an Account of the Political History; Present Condition of the People, &C Founded on a Series of Annual Journeys Between Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1824 edition. Excerpt: ...object named throughout the country; while even that was then but just known. Johnson, it is true, could not see them, from physical defects; but Pennant talked of pictures, since he described those at Duplin and had an artist in his service: yet he has scarcely mentioned one spot of all that he saw, as a man who felt the beauty of scenery. The account which Birt, long before, gives of the hideous Highland mountains and glens, is absolutely ludicrous. I know not exactly when Edinburgh was first discovered to be the most romantic city in the world; but that is a discovery of no high antiquity. I myself was one of the first, and, I believe, the very first absolute stranger, who visited Loch Cateran. I had then a Scottish map in which it was not even inserted: you and the Lady of the Lake can tell another tale now. Even in another and kindred art, it is well known what was thought of Gothic architecture not very long ago; and whence, indeed, the very name originated. Every one knows what even professional architects thought of it; nor was it till the time of Gray and Walpole, that the public began to discover that it was not a ponderous, gloomy, and tasteless style, the produce of barbarism, and fitted only to delight barbarians. The great increase of domestic travelling, while it appears to originate in a taste for the beauties of Nature, is that which chiefly tends to generate it. The people begins by imagining that it sees, and admires, and understands; and it ends in doing what it had but fancied before; in seeing and admiring and understanding. If a taste for the arts of design is also yet low in Britain, there is a certain moderate portion of it widely diffused, as is a species of rambling and superficial literature; and all this aids the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 140 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 263g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236556593
  • 9781236556592