High-Speed Steel; The Development, Nature, Treatment, and Use of High-Speed Steels, Together with Some Suggestions as to the Problems Involved in Their Use

High-Speed Steel; The Development, Nature, Treatment, and Use of High-Speed Steels, Together with Some Suggestions as to the Problems Involved in Their Use

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...with the need for separate indicating instruments for all the furnaces, but obviously requires the continuous services of some one to attend to the matter of temperature regulation alone. It has the further advantage of relieving the furnace operator of the distraction occasioned by frequent readings of the pyrometer when he has to do this himself. In a small plant such an arrangement of course is not feasible, and some simpler means are necessary. In general, one indicator is sufficient for a small plant, though it is very desirable that a recording indicator be also a part of the installation--both, of course, designed and calibrated for the pyrometer used. These can, if desired, be fitted with alarm contacts capable of being set for any required maximum and minimum temperatures. The indicator or recorder boom, on passing the contact, automatically rings a bell at short intervals as long as the temperature is outside the limits set. Such a device will result in a much closer regulation, usually, where it is necessary to work very near to a given temperature. Value and Forms of Records.--Records of this sort are more important than might at first be thought. It is a well-established fact that any operator, whether working on high-speed tools, firing a steam boiler, or at any other work requiring the maintenance of uniform temperatures, will more carefully regulate his furnace and take greater care to preserve uniformity if he have a continuous record staring him in the face and constantly reminding him of departures from the required standard, than he will without such a record, even if he have an indicator before him which can be consulted at will. It is in the study of conditions, however, and the determination of those most suitable for the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 120 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236579259
  • 9781236579256