Henley's Twentieth Century Formulas, Recipes and Processes; Containing Ten Thousand Selected Household and Workshop Formulas, Recipes, Processes, and Moneysaving Methods of the Practical Use of Manufacturers, Mechanics, Housekeepers and

Henley's Twentieth Century Formulas, Recipes and Processes; Containing Ten Thousand Selected Household and Workshop Formulas, Recipes, Processes, and Moneysaving Methods of the Practical Use of Manufacturers, Mechanics, Housekeepers and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ...Blue.--One hundred and forty parts of hyposulphite of soda are dissolved in 1,000 parts of water; 35 parts of acetate of lead are dissolved in 1,000 parts of water; the two solutions are mixed, boiled, and the iron is immersed therein. The metal takes a blue color, such as is obtained by heating. To Distinguish Iron from Steel.--The piece of metal to be tested is washed and then plunged into a solution of bichromate of potash, with the addition of considerable sulphuric acid. In half a minute or a minute the metal can be taken out, washed, and wiped. Soft steels and cast iron assume under this treatment an ash-gray tint. Tempered steels become almost black, without any metallic reflection. Puddled and refined irons remain nearly white and always have metallic reflections on the part of their surface previously filed, the remainder of the surface presenting irregular blackish spots. Another method is to apply a magnet. Steel responds much more quickly and actively to the magnetic influence than does iron. Powder for Hardening Iron and Steel.--For wrought iron place in the charge 20 parts, by weight, of common salt; 2 parts, by weight, of potassium cyanide; 0.3 parts, by weight, of potassium bi chromate; 0.15 parts, by weight, of broken glass; and 0.1 part, by weight, of potassium nitrate for case-hardening. For cooling and hardening cast iron: To 60 parts, by weight, of water add 2.5 parts, by weight, of vinegar; 3 parts, by weight, of common salt; and 0.25 parts, by weight, of hydrochloric acid. Preventing the Peeling of Coatings for Iron.--To obviate the scaling of coatings on iron, if exposed to the attacks of the weather, it is advisable to wash the iron thoroughly and to paint it next with a layer of boiling linseed oil. If thus treated, the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 630 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 32mm | 1,107g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236542819
  • 9781236542816