Helen Macfarlane

Helen Macfarlane : A Feminist, Revolutionary Journalist, and Philosopher in Mid 19th Century England

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Helen Macfarlane, revolutionary social critic, feminist and Hegelian philosopher was the first English translator of Karl Marx and Fredrich Engel's theCommunist Manifesto. Her original translation is included in this edition. Marx publicly admired her as a rare and original thinker and journalist. This book recreates her intellectual and political world at a key turning point in European history.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 192 pages
  • 152.4 x 223.5 x 15.2mm | 272.16g
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MD, United States
  • English
  • 0739108646
  • 9780739108642

Review quote

Helen Macfarlane was a truly remarkable figure: the first translator of The Communist Manifesto, an early socialist who discussed Hegel, Christianity, and revolution, and a merciless critic of all forms of domination, whether by class, race, or gender. She flickered briefly across British radicalism before disappearing from the historical record. Dave Black has done a marvelous job of excavation, contextualization, and careful analysis, giving us the first-ever book on Macfarlane's life and work. An additional merit of this volume is the reprinting of Macfarlane's sometimes very beautiful translation of the Manifesto. -- Kevin B. Anderson, co-editor of Marx on Suicide David Black has rendered British social history - and the history of Chartism in particular - as well as the history of socialist ideas in Britain a distinct service by devoting a book-length study to this remarkable woman. Victorian Studies In Helen Macfarlane: A Feminist Revolutionary Journalist and Philosopher in Mid-Eighteenth Century England, David Black has done astute historical detective work to rescue from erasure a key figure in socialist history. Under the alias of "Howard Morton," Helen Macfarlane wrote the first English translation of The Communist Manifesto for the magazine The Red Republican. An active member of mid-nineteenth century British socialist circles, she contributed to the direction of radical dissent and the legacy of Chartism. Rich in detail, Black's book maps out some of the major debates in which Macfarlane was involved and offers a fascinating archive for anyone interested in the prehistory of British Hegelian thought. -- Rosemary Hennessey, author of Profit and Pleasure: Sexual Identities in Late Capitalismshow more

About David Black

David Black is an independent scholar and author of Acid: A New Secret History of LSD. Hear the author discuss his work on BBC Radio here.show more

Table of contents

Chapter 1 Interrogating History Chapter 2 The Making of Red Republicanism Chapter 3 Hegel's England Chapter 4 Fraternal Democrats Chapter 5 The Mystery of a Nom de Plume Chapter 6 Humbug Manufactures and Rosewater Sentimentalists Chapter 7 Christianity and Socialism Chapter 8 Helen Macfarlane's Interpretation of Hegel Chapter 9 Antigone in 1848 Chapter 10 Thomas Carlyle and the Red Republicans Chapter 11 Translator of The Communist Manifesto Chapter 12 Theory and Organization Chapter 13 "A Rare Bird:" Marx's Encounter with Macfarlane Chapter 14 The End of Chartism Chapter 15 The Legacy of Hegelian Marxism 16 Appendix A, The Published Writings of Helen Macfarlane 17 Appendix B, The Communist Manifesto: Helen Macfarlane's 1850 Translationshow more

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