Hebrew Inscriptions; From the Valleys Between Egypt and Mount Sinai, in Their Original Characters, with Translations and an Alphabet

Hebrew Inscriptions; From the Valleys Between Egypt and Mount Sinai, in Their Original Characters, with Translations and an Alphabet

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ...cut short. We have the word pan in No. 74; and judging from the way in which the D in No. 166, though the last letter in the word, is drawn back to be the first, I venture to read this imperfect character here as a D. In Jerem. xxxi. 22, the Jews and Israelites who did not return home when Cyrus gave them leave to do so, are said to be "wandering about," and this word is there used. The cross at the head of this inscription may be the Egyptian character for "life," but it was more probably meant for the symbol of Christianity. The writer would not have used a pagan symbol. He was a Christian Jew. He does not contradict the Jewish opinion, that the nation's misfortunes were a punishment for guilt; he probably means that the nation was "guiltless" towards its Roman masters. This may have been written in the second century, when the cross had already become a symbol of Christianity, and while there were yet Jews professing that religion. No. 13.: vbn pp-"ny abv: vr yy b2 prn ap A peace-offering for her that is made bare, broken to pieces, cast off. Raise up the broken lest she die, 0 Jehovah. Or the first line might read as nbilp pi, as if "the assembly" were naked, broken to pieces. But the above is to be preferred. In Micah iv. 7 we have the verb Nn, to cast off, to remove far off; or our word may be the adverb nNn, beyond. In pm the middle letter is not wanted. The Hebrew word is pi, pn, or pn; but here the cases are frequent in which the letter n is inserted. The word yu' is remarkable; for in these inscriptions the feeble letters are usually dropt. If we divide the words differently, and read J/U 'b2, we equally have to note the unusual presence of the feeble letter. The o in the second line...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236797949
  • 9781236797940