Heat as a Source of Power; With Applications of General Principles to the Construction of Steam Generators. an Introduction to the Study of Heat-Engines

Heat as a Source of Power; With Applications of General Principles to the Construction of Steam Generators. an Introduction to the Study of Heat-Engines

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1874 edition. Excerpt: ...made as near to the furnace as possible, and not by adding length at the extreme end towards the chimney. This is equivalent to diminishing the unit by which s is measured in the preceding formulas rather than to increase the number of larger units. CHAPTER V. STEAM GENERATORS. 207. To whatever use heat is to be applied through the medium of steam, the apparatus for generating and retaining the steam is constructed on the same general principles for all purposes, and is popularly termed a Boiler. It may be described in general terms as a closed metallic vessel, kept partly filled with water, with arrangements for imparting heat to the water by means of the combustion of fuel. The steam generated is confined in the vessel, above the water, until it is required for use, when it is drawn off through pipes. If the steam is required as a source of power, it is supplied to another apparatus, called the steam-engine, to which the flow of steam from the boiler is controlled by automatic mechanism. If the heat of the steam be required for other purposes, such as warming apartments, or for heating liquids or other bodies, the flow is generally regulated by hand, or is dependent on the condensation of the steam at the point at which it is utilized. This metallic vessel, with its compartments and openings, takes the name of boiler in the shops where it is manufactured. But in many classes or forms of boilers the steam-generating apparatus is not complete until the boiler is set up in brickwork, with an external furnace constructed for the combustion of the fuel, and external flues made for conducting the heated gases to the chimney along the sides of the boiler. In others the boiler is ready for use as it comes from the manufacturer, having within...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 72 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 145g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236909941
  • 9781236909947