Heat; Science and Philosophy of Its Production and Application to the Warming and Ventilation of Buildings, the Absorbing and Transmitting Power of Different Boiler and Radiator Surfaces with Steam and Water Circulation. Volume 1

Heat; Science and Philosophy of Its Production and Application to the Warming and Ventilation of Buildings, the Absorbing and Transmitting Power of Different Boiler and Radiator Surfaces with Steam and Water Circulation. Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1890 edition. Excerpt: ...little heat. Mr. Wray has observed that all successful contrivances for burning petroleum must distribute the flame upon the surface to be heated, and not beneath it. Inattention to this condition is the cause of many unsuccessful attempts to generate steam by the use of crude petroleum. It is impossible that I should attempt to describe the great number of apparatus devised for burning the crude oil, many of which are entirely adequate. The successful use of the oil for years in stationary engines has demonstrated the absence of all serious practical difficulties. The questions of economy and safety appear to have determined that for general use it is not a desirable fuel; while in special cases it has been attended with complete satisfaction. The action of hydrocarbons at a red heat has been investigated by M. Coquillon. He shows that steam assists the decomposition of the hydrocarbons, producing at the same time a fall of temperature, which is added to that produced by the reduction of carbonic oxide and carbonic acid. GASOLINE. "We are often asked the questions by people who are not acquainted with the products of petroleum: 'What is gasoline? What is it made of?' The answer is: It is one of the light products of petroleum. Every hundred barrels of crude oil, as it is pumped out of the wells, contain about fifteen barrels of gasoline or naphtha. In the process of refining this oil, the gasoline is separated from the rest, and is redistilled and refined, and is then called refined naphtha, benzine, burning fluid, and gasoline, according to the gravity it bears. The best gravity for use of these stoves is seventy-four, and nothing heavier should be used, as it is likely to contain traces of oil and paraffine, which fill and clog up the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 124 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 236g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236581083
  • 9781236581082