Hawkins Electrical Guide; Questions, Answers & Illustrations a Progressive Course of Study for Engineers, Electricians, Students and Those Desiring to Acquire a Working Knowledge of Electricity and Its Applications a Practical Volume 4

Hawkins Electrical Guide; Questions, Answers & Illustrations a Progressive Course of Study for Engineers, Electricians, Students and Those Desiring to Acquire a Working Knowledge of Electricity and Its Applications a Practical Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...that decreasing thereactance decreases the angle and increases cos or the power factor. The circular arc in each figure being at unity distance from the center A, the power factor with decreasing reactance evidently approaches unity as its limit, this limit being shown in fig. 1,365 where the reactance B'C'= O. Ques. What is the usual value of the power factor in practice? Ans. Slightly less than one. Ques. Why is it desirable to keep the power factor near unity? Ans. Because with a low power factor, while the alternator may be carrying its full load and operating at a moderate temperature, the consumer is paying only for the actual watts which are sent over the line to him. For instance, if a large alternator supplying 1,000 kilowatts at 6,600 volts in a town where a number of induction motors are used on the Fig. 1,366.--Diagram illustrating power factor test, when on noneinductive and inductive circuits. The instruments are connected as shown and by means of the double throw switch can be put on either the noneinductive or inductive circuit. First turn switch to left so that current passes through the lamps: for illustration, the following readings are assumed: ammeter 10, voltmeter 110, and wattmeter 1,100. The power factor then is wattmeter reading + volts X amperes = 1,100 actual watts 4e1,100 apparent watts =1, that is, on noneinductive circuit the power factor is unity. Now throwing the switch to the right connecting instruments with the inductive circuits, then for illustration the following readings may be assumed: ammeter 8, voltmeter 110, and wattmeter 684. Now, as before, power factor--wattmeter reading + volts X amperes = 684 + (8 X 110)--684 eie 880 =.78. line be operating with a power factor of say.625 during a great...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 58 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 122g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236620739
  • 9781236620736