The Hawaiian Forester and Agriculturist; A Quarterly Magazine of Forestry, Entomology, Plant Inspection and Animal Industry Volume 10

The Hawaiian Forester and Agriculturist; A Quarterly Magazine of Forestry, Entomology, Plant Inspection and Animal Industry Volume 10

By (author) 

List price: US$10.17

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...in the investigation was designed to show whether the commonly practised custom of watering cuts lengthened or shortened the duration of the dripping period. In round numbers it was found that when the cut was watered the tree continued to drip for eighty-one minutes, when the cut was not watered, for 102 minutes; that when the tree was watered it yielded 250 drops, when not watered 510 drops. A second and more extensive experiment led to the astonishing conclusion that one thousand trees would give about i lb. less rubber a day if water were poured on the cuts than they would give if the cuts were not watered. The reason for this appears to be that the addition of water induces coagulation.--Agricultural News. LIME JUICE AND SCURVY. The most notable example of the effect of certain substances existing in food in only minute traces is afforded by the investigations that have led to the discovery of the cause of beri-beri. Volume IX of the Annual Reports of the Chemical Society (1912) contains a review of this work, where the well-known fact is referred to, that the disease is prevalent among rice-eating communities in which decorticated or polished rice is consumed. Whole rice does not induce the disease. The substance inhibiting beri-beri has been extracted from rice husks by water or alcohol, and an alkaloid has been isolated to which the name of oryzanin is given. Small quantities of this substance keep animals free from the disease. More recently, in the Journal of the Chemical Society for March, 1913, an investigation along similar lines is referred to, which has brought to light the fact that lime juice contains an antineuritic substance which is probably a specific cure for scurvy. The investigation was hampered by the guinea pigs...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 146 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 272g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236930444
  • 9781236930446