The Harmony of Interests, Agricultural, Manufacturing and Commercial; (Besonderer Abdruck Aus Der Ztschrift. the Plough the Loom and the Anvil.) 1849 - 1850

The Harmony of Interests, Agricultural, Manufacturing and Commercial; (Besonderer Abdruck Aus Der Ztschrift. the Plough the Loom and the Anvil.) 1849 - 1850

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1849 edition. Excerpt: ...occasions the same operations were repeated. So again in 1846, furnaces were built, and now, in 1849, they are being closed. The consequence of this is that the iron manufacture throughout the country is in a barbarous condition. Small furnaces abound, at which much labour is given to producing little iron. At each forced intermission of the exertions of England to maintain the monopoly of the production of this important commodity, we can see it making its way gradually to the land where alone it can be produced at small cost of labour--that land where ore, coal, and limestone are interstratified with each other, and at which it would long since have arrived but for our frequent changes of policy. Merchants' Magazine, Vol. XX. p. 337. Very little examination is necessary to satisfy the inquirer that it has been precisely when iron has been lowest in England, in 1822 and 1843, that our consumption was least; and it is now diminishing rapidly, as our furnaces are being closed and their owners ruined. The power to consume declines daily. With another year or two the price abroad will be high, but time will then be required to get the old furnaces into operation, and still longer to build new ones; for iron-making is like buying lottery tickets, and the blanks are more numerous than the prizes. That time arrived, pig iron may be again $40 and bars $80 per ton. So long as a nation is dependent on England for any portion of its supply, so long must prices continue to be thus variable, and so long must the consumption of this important article, and the facilities for producing it, be small, and all the deficiency falls on the producer of food, or wool, or cotton; for it is he that pays the cost of transportation, conversion and exchange. The...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 86 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236567323
  • 9781236567321