Hansard's Parliamentary Debates, Third Series Commencing with the Accession of William IV. 27 & 28 Victoriae, 1864. Vol CLXXVI. Comprising the Period

Hansard's Parliamentary Debates, Third Series Commencing with the Accession of William IV. 27 & 28 Victoriae, 1864. Vol CLXXVI. Comprising the Period

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1864 edition. Excerpt: ...unless our own interests are affected, whatever schemes of spoliation and aggression are entertained by other nations, giving free scope to that unprincipled ambition by which the councils of nations are too frequently guided, wrong and violence will prevail without check; and if we ourselves should become their object, in the day of our necessity we must expect the rule we have applied to others to be applied to us, and we shall meet with no sympathy or support in any quarter, because we have deliberately withheld our aid from the weak when threatened with oppression. I do not mean to say that we should undertake the general redress of all cases of injustice. Far from it. The circumstances of each case must be taken into account, and it mutt be considered whether we can interfere with advantage. But the power which we possess and the station which we occupy impose on us tbe sacred duty of maintaining, as far as we are able, tho principles of justice in the international relations of Europe. Looking at the condition of Schleswig before the invasion, it was in the enjoyment of undisturbed peace. There was no serious attempt at resistance to the authority of the Danish Government. But it was perfectly clear that otree we allowed the German troops to enter Schleswig, under cover of their presence a system of agitation would be got tip which must make it practically impossible to bring about a satisfactory settlement. That is the noble Earl's reason for not interfering now, and I admit its force. It was shown from the first that that difficulty would occur, and therefore I say that that was a reason for our interfering earlier and preventing a state of things arising, in which we are powerless to undo the eiil that has been done. But we are...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 1070 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 53mm | 1,869g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236523318
  • 9781236523310