Handbook of the Turf; A Treasury of Information for Horsemen Embracing a Compendium of All Racing and Trotting Rules; Laws of the States in Their Relation to Horses and Racing; A Glossary of Scientific Terms; The Catch-Words and Phrases

Handbook of the Turf; A Treasury of Information for Horsemen Embracing a Compendium of All Racing and Trotting Rules; Laws of the States in Their Relation to Horses and Racing; A Glossary of Scientific Terms; The Catch-Words and Phrases

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...or against time, either double or single. Maiden Stakes. The money contested for in a race between young horses that have never run before. It is a term exclusively used in connection with the racing turf. Making a Mouth. A term used by trainers in accustoming the young colt they are handling, to the bit. The term, "My colt has no mouth yet," means that he has not been sufficiently trained to the bit. Making' the Pace. The leading horse in a heat or race is said to make the pace for all the contending horses engaged; hence, at his highest speed, the horse is said to be "making the pace." Making the Running. Where a rider urges his horse from start to finish, or in other words forces the pace, he is said to be "making the running." The jockey should never make his own running except when he is on a horse that frets or goes unkindly when there is anything in front of him, or when he cannot get any other rider to force the pace fast enough. It may be good policy, when the ground is heavy, for a light weight to make the running, as weight tells far more through "dirt," than when the horses can hear their feet rattle.--Riding, M. Horace Hayes, M. R. C. V. S. Mallenders. Normal structures, or patches on which no hair grows, existing at birth and equally developed in both sexes, upon the inner surface of the fore limb, but nearer the hinder than the front border; and constituting one of the characteristic distinctions by which the species Equus caballus, is separated from the other member of the genus. On the fore limb the mallenders are placed upon the inner surface above the carpal or knee joint. They are about two inches long and three-fourths of an inch wide, pointed at each end, and situated...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 245g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236981197
  • 9781236981196