A Handbook of Modern Arabic; Consisting of a Practical Grammar, with Numerous Examples, Dialogues, and Newspaper Extracts in a European Type

A Handbook of Modern Arabic; Consisting of a Practical Grammar, with Numerous Examples, Dialogues, and Newspaper Extracts in a European Type

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1866 edition. Excerpt: ...at present the Dual and the Plurals Feminine, which are rarely used. There is no difference in the inflections of the two verbs, except that Zekrif takes o for the first letter of its aorist. The i in parenthesis for the 2nd pers. sing, denotes the feminine. N.P.--In old Arabic the perfect singular had final vowels, thus, 1. jelesto; 2 m. jeleste; 3 m. jeles. The final vowels may be kept before a suffix; nay, perhaps we can thus distinguish Balalha (we have arrived or attained) from Balafa-na (or Bal'fa-na), it has reached us. Faris occasionally writes the 2nd m. as Jelest-, even without a suffix. To retain this final vowel discriminates 2nd person from 1 st, and involves no countervailing evil. To distinguish the person of Jelest we may add Ana (I) or Ente (thou); but it is often done more delicately by a suffix, if Enna or Lecinna precedes; as, Enn-c jelest, that thou hast sat; Lecinm jelest, yet I have sat. Knowing the imperative (as Ijlis, Zekrif) we can inflect the three tenses as above; observing, as to the vowels, only these simple rules: (a.) The vowels of the perfect in the spoken language are always "Fathite," as in the Table, in verbs of such type. (J.) The last vowel of the aorist is always that of the imperative; the other vowels as in the Table. The last vowel may be a, i, o, in a triradical verb, but invariable in the quadriradical. (c.) If the vowel be a, i, the first vowel of the imperative is i; but if o then o: as, Ijlis, sit thou; Iqtaf, cut thou; Okroj, go out; Orbot, tie, bind. The ancient verb distinguished in the aorist two moods by a different vowel o a added to the end. But this is totally lost and irrecoverable. 109. The classical dual in 2nd and 3rd person is sometimes used. Final d, i, is its mark....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236535022
  • 9781236535023