Handbook of the British Flora; A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous To, or Naturalized In, the British Isles for the Use of Begi

Handbook of the British Flora; A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous To, or Naturalized In, the British Isles for the Use of Begi

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1865 edition. Excerpt: ...very few, with long, linear bracts; the 2 or 3 lowest ones female, and often shortly stalked. Fruiting heads smaller than in the last two species, and the styles or points to the fruits very much shorter. In lakes and pools, in northern and Arctic Europe, Asia, and America; and in the high mountain-ranges of southern Europe and central Asia. In Britain, more frequent in Scotland and Ireland than in England. Fl. summer. Fig. 935. LXXV. THE ARUM FAMILY. AROIDE.E. Herbs, with the rootstock often tuberous but not bulbous; the veins of the leaves sometimes branched or even netted, almost as in Dicotyledons. Flowers closely packed in a dense spike, called a spadix, with a leaf-like or coloured bract at the base, called a spatha. The stamens and ovaries either in different parts of the spike or mixed together, without any perianth, or separated by small scales, which rarely form a small regular perianth. Ovary with 1 or several cells, each with 1 or more ovules. Fruit a berry. Seeds with or rarely without albumen. A considerable family, chiefly from the tropical and warmer parts of the globe, where many acquire a considerable size, or climb up the stems of trees. The large spatha and broad leaves are at once characteristic of the majority of species; a few however come near to the Bulrushes in habit, but are always distinguished by their succulent fruit, and in most cases by the seeds, or at least the ovules, not solitary. Leaves broad. Spatha largo 1. Abcm. Leaves and spatha long and linear Plant reed-like 2. Acobcs. I. ARUM. ARUM. Spatha large, convolute (the edges rolled over each other) at the base. No perianth. Pistils or female flowers at the base of the spike. Stamens or male flowers above them; the club-shaped summit of the axis without flowers....
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Product details

  • Paperback | 152 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236509099
  • 9781236509093