Hand-Book of the Manufactures and Arts of the Punjab; Forming Vol. II. to the Hand-Book of the Economic Products of the Punjab.

Hand-Book of the Manufactures and Arts of the Punjab; Forming Vol. II. to the Hand-Book of the Economic Products of the Punjab.

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ...for flint and tinder purposes: the leather part of the pouch is prettily ornamented with brass or silver. Egerton's Tour in Spiti, p. 25. t See tho Photograph at page 30 of Mr. Egerton's book on Spiti. X Cunningham's Ladak, p. 305. Simla States. The Kannwar people, and also those toward Simla States, wear huge zinc rings or tubes round the ankles; silver or zinc bracelets, round silver ear-rings, and have also a large open brass brooch, of which the characteristic form is--This brooch serves to fasten the upper shawl, or waist girdle; the plate at page 304 in Cunningham's Ladakh shews it to advantage. Necklaces of glass beads, and coral and amber, are here in fashion also. Kulu.--The profusion of large bead, amber, and coral necklaces disappears among the Kulu people; they wear mostly silver, not a little of it is prettily enamelled; this latter work is done at Kangra and at Jagat Sukh. A Kulu woman wears round her neck chains of small coral or glass beads, and chains of silver beads cut into facets, and having small enamelled pendants hanging therefrom. They wear a nose ring of gold or silver with a pendant spoon-shaped ornament hanging from the ring. They wear also round ear-rings with bunches of silver bobbins and chains attached; also bracelets like those in the plains. Some of the richer women wear a head ornament, which is fixed over the forehead under the plaits of hair and woollen thread, which form a coronal. The ornament consists of two broad plaits of silver wire work, which, separating from the central point of suspension, are worn like braids of hair on either side of the face, and terminate in silver tassels: they resemble those worn in Spiti, but are smaller. Ornaments Worn In The Plains. Derajat. The ornaments worn in the Derajat...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 202 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 372g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236519108
  • 9781236519108