A Hand-Book of Industrial Organic Chemistry; Adapted for the Use of Manufacturers, Chemists, and All Interested in the Utilization of Organic Materials in the Industrial Arts

A Hand-Book of Industrial Organic Chemistry; Adapted for the Use of Manufacturers, Chemists, and All Interested in the Utilization of Organic Materials in the Industrial Arts

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...as "kephir grains." According to Kern, as quoted by Allen (Commercial Organic Analysis, 2d ed., vol. iv. p. 242), the kephir ferment is an elastic cauliflower-like mass found below the snow line on certain bushes. The fungus consists of bacilli and yeast-cells, each cell containing two round spores, whence the name Dispora caucasina. When dried, the kephir fungus forms haid yellowish grains about the size of peas. By soaking these in water and adding them to milk, alcoholic fermentation ensues and the kephir is matured in a few days. The following figures show the comparative percentage composition of fresh milk, kephir, and koumiss: 7. Casein Preparations.--Casein is now utilized on a large scale, first, as a basis of food preparations; second, as a fixing agent in calico printing instead of albumen; and third, as a substitute for glue in cements. For the first class of compounds, the casein salts of the alkalies and alkaline earths are used, and are obtained by dissolving casein in the calculated amount of caustic alkali, alkali metal, carbonate or phosphate or milk of lime, and evaporating the solution in vacuo. The products are dry white powders. For the second class of compounds, casein is generally dissolved in ammonia, the solution evaporated, and the residue mixed with milk of lime. Lactarine is a commercial preparation of this class used as a fixing agent. A mixture of casein with slaked lime sets to a hard insoluble mass, which is sometimes employed as a cement for earthenware and for similar purposes as a cheap substitute for glue. In making these casein cements the most important point that is to be noted to insure success is the freeing of the casein from all oily matter. Therefore, when curd is prepared from milk, use only...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 234 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 426g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236494563
  • 9781236494566